Football

Pablo Aimar Points Out A Problem In How Football Is Viewed And Talked About Today

Pablo Aimar Points Out A Problem In How Football Is Viewed And Talked About Today

If you are of an age to remember Pablo Aimar at his peak, then lucky you.

The Argentine was an impish, devilish delight, and was an integral part of the Valencia side that broke the Real Madrid/Barcelona duopoly in La Liga in 2002 and 2004, and was hailed by Leo Messi as one of the primary influences upon his career.

Here is one random clip illustrative of his ability, an utterly filthy pass at the Mestella in the first La Liga-winning season.

Aimar has recently taken his first steps into management, and was this week announced as the new coach of the Argentina Under-17s.

Since taking the job, he has started meditating on where the game is headed, and the differences between his generation and the one he is now coaching.

He has done exactly that in an interview with La Tinta in Argentina. One of the points he made is pretty much spot on. Much of football has migrated to and splintered across the internet, and now exists on social media and Reputable Irish Sports Websites.

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As a result, nobody really watches full games anymore, what with the guarantee that they will be long and the high chance that they will be pretty dull.

Aimar goes a little Socratic as he makes the following point regarding the importance of talking about football, and focus on what is actually happening on the pitch throughout the whole game, rather than a couple of individual moments.

We are the last generation that enjoys watching whole matches. Nowadays, people are more used to what's brief, short-lived. A PlayStation match lasts just between five to seven minutes.

People are now accustomed to highlights; to watch in their cellphones goals from every football league. They are victims of this encouragement, stimulus. But we are still delighted with the game; we are still waiting for a great play. When there are enjoyable, entertaining games it's easier to get thrilled though.

If you speak Spanish, the full interview is available here.

See Also: Celtic's Leigh Griffiths Charged By UEFA For Inciting Linfield Supporters

 

Gavin Cooney
Article written by
Changed the spelling of his name upon pressure from Michael Owen.

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