Football

Twelve Stadiums In The Frame For Ireland And UK's World Cup Bid

Twelve Stadiums In The Frame For Ireland And UK's World Cup Bid

The possible joint World Cup bid between the UK and Ireland would include twelve stadiums, two of which are on the island of Ireland.

Last September, reports emerged that Ireland could form part of a joint bid along with the United Kingdom for the 2030 World Cup.

The FAI then announced they would join the other associations in conducting "a feasibility review" of the plan.

The potential bid received a further boost when British Prime Minister Theresa May declared joint support for the idea during a visit to Belfast last month:

The UK and the Irish Governments have already made clear that we would support the tantalising possibility of a joint UK and Ireland World Cup Bid for 2030, should our respective football associations choose to pursue this.

Per the Telegraph, the FAs involved have agreed to a 40,000-seat minimum for each stadium in the bid. While FIFA have the final say, twelve stadiums are listed as possibilities, with only one falling below the threshold.

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Wembley Stadium, London.
Old Trafford, Manchester.
Millennium Stadium, Cardiff.
London Stadium, London.
Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, London.
Celtic Park, Glasgow.
Emirates Stadium, London.
Etihad Stadium, Manchester.
Anfield, Liverpool.
St James' Park, Newcastle.
Hampden Park, Glasgow.
The Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Ireland.
Ibrox Stadium, Glasgow.
Stadium of Light, Sunderland.
Villa Park, Birmingham.
Windsor Park, Belfast.

The 2030 World Cup is the next which a European venue is a viable option. In 2020, Dublin's Aviva Stadium will host three group matches and a last-16 tie for the European Championships while Croke Park, which is not included in the list, was included in the failed 2023 World Cup bid.

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