Gaming

10 Footballers Who Had A Video Game Named After Them

10 Footballers Who Had A Video Game Named After Them

Footballer endorsed video games aren't really a thing anymore, mainly because FIFA and Pro Evo dominate the market in such a way that any studio is terrified to try and release a new footy game, but there was a time when they were the be-all and end-all for the virtual representation of the beautiful game.

Some of them were good, most of them were absolutely crap, but we've had a look back at some of the more notable and nostalgia games that were named after a footballer, from the likes of Brazilian Ronaldo, to Chris Kamara (no disrespect to the legend that is Kammy).

If you were the owner of any of them, for better or worse, feel free to get in touch and share your memories of the game, but without further ado, here are 10 footballers who had a game named after them.

David Beckham Soccer

footballer endorsed video games

DBS was a needless football game that served no purpose other than to cash in on the frenzy around David Beckham when it was released late in 2001. That said, it actually wasn't that bad.

There was a clear emphasis on making set-pieces have a lot of dip and bend, due to the cover star no doubt, but apart from that it was your standard PlayStation football game that didn't have the official licences so instead offered up some extremely lazy alternatives.

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Still, if the game was bought for you by a relative or as a surprise Santa gift, it was grand.

Ronaldo V-Football

footballer endorsed video games

Unlike most of the games on this list, 'Ronaldo V-Football' was actually a bloody good game. Right from the intro it was special, as the iconic 'Samba De Janeiro' blasted through your TV, but all the teams were there, the commentary was iconic, and the gameplay was quick and satisfying.

The 'V-Football Cup' was the standard World Cup tournament mode, but 'Endurance' was where the hardcore players went on a mission to beat every team in the game in ranked tiers of 8.

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The graphics were good, it had an officially licensed Ronaldo in it (which is more than FIFA and PES could claim at the time), and it played well. 'Ronaldo V-Football' was a winner.

O'Leary Manager 2000

 

footballer endorsed video games

Yes, David O'Leary had his own football game.

A management sim for the Gameboy Colour, you could be forgiven for thinking that it was a crap, low-budget game, but it was actually a surprisingly decent low-budget game that has aged rather well.

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We did a full review of the game after we found out that it existed a few years back, but really it was ahead of it's time and brought a fun management game to the Gameboy. You could also play games yourself too. Nice one.

Michael Owen's World League Soccer

footballer endorsed video games

Released on the Nintendo 64, Playstation, and Dreamcast at the turn of the millennium, Michael Owen's WLS was one of those games that was so bad it was good. It received two versions, '99 and 2000, and was released in the USA under the name 'Mia Hamm Soccer' with the female US soccer star being seen as a more marketable option.

What it offered was an astonishing amount of playable leagues and teams, but the graphics were really bad for the time and the gameplay was clunky and awkward.

It also featured the single worst intro known to man.

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Have fun. More of an order than a suggestion.

Kevin Keegan's Player Manager

footballer endorsed video games

Released for the Super Nintendo in 1993, the same game was also released in Germany under the name K.H. Rummenigge's Player Manager, which is odd considering how big Keegan would have been in Germany.

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Anyway, the main menu was a hilarious digital representation of Keegan's office.

The options were limited, and so was the enjoyment.

Peter Shilton's Handball Maradona

footballer endorsed video games

Released for the Commodore 64 in 1986, 'Peter Shilton's Handball Maradona' is the funniest title for a football game ever seen.

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Despite featuring Maradona's name, the game only featured 16 teams from the top fight of England. Matches were split into two halves where players were given 3 or 4 opportunities to make saves. It really was a simpler time.

Wolves and West Brom, for some reason, were the only officially licenced teams.

Chris Kamara Street Soccer

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Kammy had his own game, although he had absolutely nothing to do with it.

After allowing a Sheffield United fan to name the PlayStation game that he had designed around his favourite player, Chris Kamara had no further involvement and indeed does not feature at all in a game that features 'street' teams from around the World.

There is a Dublin team, and they feature players such as 'Rory', 'Joxer', 'Declan', and 'Dave', and there are six different levels at random locations around the world.

A really, really weird game, it was a low budget title in 2000 and is now talked about as one of the strangest football games ever released.

Gazza's Superstar Soccer

footballer endorsed video games

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Released for the Amstrad, Amiga, and C64 in 1989, Gazza's superstar soccer was an interesting football game that changed angles depending on where you were on the pitch.

For the most part it looked like a television broadcast, until the player got into the final third and the camera switched to look at the goal.

An odd system, but a decent representation of the beautiful game in 1989.

Alex Ferguson's Player Manager 2001

footballer endorsed video games

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Bad. A bad game.

Despite not being a player-manager at the time, Fergie's player-manager allowed the user all the tinkering of a management game, but with the ability to play the matches yourself. It would have been better off as a strictly management game, as the gameplay was terrible.

Incredibly, it was brought back for a second season and also released on the PlayStation 2 before it was axed and never to be heard of again.

Steven Gerrard's Total Soccer 2002

footballer endorsed video games

Much like David O'Leary's game, 'Steven Gerrard's Total Soccer 2002' was also only for Gameboy Colour, and it was made by the same studio... And featured almost identical menus and imagery.

In fact, it was essentially the same game as O'Leary Manager but without the management detail.

It was nothing special, but chances are you weren't complaining if you were playing football games on your Gameboy in the year 2002.

SEE ALSO: Cantona Bemuses All With Strange Speech Before Champions League Draw

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