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Today We Learned The Super Mario Coin Sound Effect Is Trademarked

Today We Learned The Super Mario Coin Sound Effect Is Trademarked
By Oisin Gaffey Updated
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The coin sound effect in Super Mario is one of the most recognisable sounds in modern pop-culture. Even those who have never played Super Mario are able to recognise the iconic chime.

Super Mario Coin Sound Effect Has Been Trademarked

Back in 2016, Nintendo submitted an application to trademark the famous sound effect after it was being used without permission on youtube and other forms of social media. The fact it took 30 years from the game's invention until 2016 to trademark the famous sound effect is baffling, but what is even funnier is the fact that Nintendo had to submit a piece of written sheet music in order for their trademark application to be approved.

READ HERE: 5 Things We Learned In The Super Mario Bros Movie Trailer

So, whilst content creators, podcasters and social media influencers will no longer be allowed to use audio recordings of the sound effect, at least they now know how to play it on the piano! It shouldn't take much practise to master it though, after all it is only 3 notes.

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We have been unable to translate the section of Japanese writing in the top left corner, but from '(T2016-14590)' it would appear that Nintendo have trademarked the iconic sound effect until the year 14590. Trust Nintendo to go above and beyond.

News about Nintendo's application has resurfaced recently, leaving many bewildered by the fact it took so long to trademark, whilst others from The United States have pointed out that the iconic sound effect is widely used in petrol stations alongside the iconic SEGA Sonic Ring sound effect. Will we see SEGA make a similar move and jump to trademark their most famous sound?

Some are taking the view online that Nintendo shouldn't trademark the sound effect at all, and are amazed that it is possible to trademark such a short soundbite.

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It's bizarre Nintendo trademarked such a short sound effect, but it is hilarious that they had to submit written sheet music consisting of just 3 notes in order for their application to be processed.

SEE ALSO: The Last Of Us Set For January TV Series Debut On HBO

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